brucesterling:

*I’m Technology Review’s fiction editor for their annual science fiction issue.  And check out my list of contributors.

http://www.technologyreview.com/twelvetomorrows/14/

(via futuramb)

snowce:

Louis Cylkow, La plage en Bretagne [The beach in Brittany]

(via 3rd-stage)

deadpresidents:

fishingboatproceeds:

fuckinmiki:

The official poster of the 2015 Women’s World Cup is beautiful

CAN’T WAIT.

USA! USA! USA! (And this is one that we can actually win!)

hyper-graf:

Shigeru Sugiura: The Last of the Mohicans

(via fanta-z)

“It is no wonder that two of the originators of punk rock—Ian Dury and Johnny Rotten of the Sex Pistols—were survivors of childhood illnesses that left them physically deformed. Ian Dury had polio as a child, joining the ranks of Neil Young and Joni Mitchell in a long list of rocker polio survivors and was a great admirer of Gene Vincent, who was disabled by two traffic accidents. Johnny Rotten had survived meningitis as a youth and turned his signature hunch, blank stare and sneer into swagger.”
comicartistevolution:

Bill Sienkiewicz 1990: Big Numbers #1
*sigh*
Big Numbers was to be an ambitious 12-part graphic novel by two of the biggest and revolutionary comic book masters at the top of their games.
It left the world of full-color spectacular fantasy superheroes behind and focused instead on grayscale renderings of a set of everyday lives thrown into chaos when an American-financed super-mall is constructed in their struggling English town.
Originally titled the The Mandelbrot Set, mathematic chaos theory factored heavily into the themes Moore was exploring. The story is expertly multi-faceted, as are the diverse, richly-layered characters that populate the town.
For a story that is built on a progressive development to be unfinished is tragic. That the project itself was thrown into chaos is tragically poetic.
Although Sienkiewicz’s art is largely denied the benefit of color, it is some of the most incredible of his career. He blends his signature expressionism with a level of realism never before seen in his work, and the juxtaposition is all the more powerful because of it. Befitting the mathematical theme of the story, the perfectly square pages are uniformly set on a repeating 4 × 4 grid with perfectly circular word balloons.
It was brilliant. It was revolutionary. And it was not to last…
comicartistevolution:

Bill Sienkiewicz 1990: Big Numbers #1
*sigh*
Big Numbers was to be an ambitious 12-part graphic novel by two of the biggest and revolutionary comic book masters at the top of their games.
It left the world of full-color spectacular fantasy superheroes behind and focused instead on grayscale renderings of a set of everyday lives thrown into chaos when an American-financed super-mall is constructed in their struggling English town.
Originally titled the The Mandelbrot Set, mathematic chaos theory factored heavily into the themes Moore was exploring. The story is expertly multi-faceted, as are the diverse, richly-layered characters that populate the town.
For a story that is built on a progressive development to be unfinished is tragic. That the project itself was thrown into chaos is tragically poetic.
Although Sienkiewicz’s art is largely denied the benefit of color, it is some of the most incredible of his career. He blends his signature expressionism with a level of realism never before seen in his work, and the juxtaposition is all the more powerful because of it. Befitting the mathematical theme of the story, the perfectly square pages are uniformly set on a repeating 4 × 4 grid with perfectly circular word balloons.
It was brilliant. It was revolutionary. And it was not to last…
comicartistevolution:

Bill Sienkiewicz 1990: Big Numbers #1
*sigh*
Big Numbers was to be an ambitious 12-part graphic novel by two of the biggest and revolutionary comic book masters at the top of their games.
It left the world of full-color spectacular fantasy superheroes behind and focused instead on grayscale renderings of a set of everyday lives thrown into chaos when an American-financed super-mall is constructed in their struggling English town.
Originally titled the The Mandelbrot Set, mathematic chaos theory factored heavily into the themes Moore was exploring. The story is expertly multi-faceted, as are the diverse, richly-layered characters that populate the town.
For a story that is built on a progressive development to be unfinished is tragic. That the project itself was thrown into chaos is tragically poetic.
Although Sienkiewicz’s art is largely denied the benefit of color, it is some of the most incredible of his career. He blends his signature expressionism with a level of realism never before seen in his work, and the juxtaposition is all the more powerful because of it. Befitting the mathematical theme of the story, the perfectly square pages are uniformly set on a repeating 4 × 4 grid with perfectly circular word balloons.
It was brilliant. It was revolutionary. And it was not to last…
comicartistevolution:

Bill Sienkiewicz 1990: Big Numbers #1
*sigh*
Big Numbers was to be an ambitious 12-part graphic novel by two of the biggest and revolutionary comic book masters at the top of their games.
It left the world of full-color spectacular fantasy superheroes behind and focused instead on grayscale renderings of a set of everyday lives thrown into chaos when an American-financed super-mall is constructed in their struggling English town.
Originally titled the The Mandelbrot Set, mathematic chaos theory factored heavily into the themes Moore was exploring. The story is expertly multi-faceted, as are the diverse, richly-layered characters that populate the town.
For a story that is built on a progressive development to be unfinished is tragic. That the project itself was thrown into chaos is tragically poetic.
Although Sienkiewicz’s art is largely denied the benefit of color, it is some of the most incredible of his career. He blends his signature expressionism with a level of realism never before seen in his work, and the juxtaposition is all the more powerful because of it. Befitting the mathematical theme of the story, the perfectly square pages are uniformly set on a repeating 4 × 4 grid with perfectly circular word balloons.
It was brilliant. It was revolutionary. And it was not to last…
comicartistevolution:

Bill Sienkiewicz 1990: Big Numbers #1
*sigh*
Big Numbers was to be an ambitious 12-part graphic novel by two of the biggest and revolutionary comic book masters at the top of their games.
It left the world of full-color spectacular fantasy superheroes behind and focused instead on grayscale renderings of a set of everyday lives thrown into chaos when an American-financed super-mall is constructed in their struggling English town.
Originally titled the The Mandelbrot Set, mathematic chaos theory factored heavily into the themes Moore was exploring. The story is expertly multi-faceted, as are the diverse, richly-layered characters that populate the town.
For a story that is built on a progressive development to be unfinished is tragic. That the project itself was thrown into chaos is tragically poetic.
Although Sienkiewicz’s art is largely denied the benefit of color, it is some of the most incredible of his career. He blends his signature expressionism with a level of realism never before seen in his work, and the juxtaposition is all the more powerful because of it. Befitting the mathematical theme of the story, the perfectly square pages are uniformly set on a repeating 4 × 4 grid with perfectly circular word balloons.
It was brilliant. It was revolutionary. And it was not to last…
comicartistevolution:

Bill Sienkiewicz 1990: Big Numbers #1
*sigh*
Big Numbers was to be an ambitious 12-part graphic novel by two of the biggest and revolutionary comic book masters at the top of their games.
It left the world of full-color spectacular fantasy superheroes behind and focused instead on grayscale renderings of a set of everyday lives thrown into chaos when an American-financed super-mall is constructed in their struggling English town.
Originally titled the The Mandelbrot Set, mathematic chaos theory factored heavily into the themes Moore was exploring. The story is expertly multi-faceted, as are the diverse, richly-layered characters that populate the town.
For a story that is built on a progressive development to be unfinished is tragic. That the project itself was thrown into chaos is tragically poetic.
Although Sienkiewicz’s art is largely denied the benefit of color, it is some of the most incredible of his career. He blends his signature expressionism with a level of realism never before seen in his work, and the juxtaposition is all the more powerful because of it. Befitting the mathematical theme of the story, the perfectly square pages are uniformly set on a repeating 4 × 4 grid with perfectly circular word balloons.
It was brilliant. It was revolutionary. And it was not to last…
comicartistevolution:

Bill Sienkiewicz 1990: Big Numbers #1
*sigh*
Big Numbers was to be an ambitious 12-part graphic novel by two of the biggest and revolutionary comic book masters at the top of their games.
It left the world of full-color spectacular fantasy superheroes behind and focused instead on grayscale renderings of a set of everyday lives thrown into chaos when an American-financed super-mall is constructed in their struggling English town.
Originally titled the The Mandelbrot Set, mathematic chaos theory factored heavily into the themes Moore was exploring. The story is expertly multi-faceted, as are the diverse, richly-layered characters that populate the town.
For a story that is built on a progressive development to be unfinished is tragic. That the project itself was thrown into chaos is tragically poetic.
Although Sienkiewicz’s art is largely denied the benefit of color, it is some of the most incredible of his career. He blends his signature expressionism with a level of realism never before seen in his work, and the juxtaposition is all the more powerful because of it. Befitting the mathematical theme of the story, the perfectly square pages are uniformly set on a repeating 4 × 4 grid with perfectly circular word balloons.
It was brilliant. It was revolutionary. And it was not to last…
comicartistevolution:

Bill Sienkiewicz 1990: Big Numbers #1
*sigh*
Big Numbers was to be an ambitious 12-part graphic novel by two of the biggest and revolutionary comic book masters at the top of their games.
It left the world of full-color spectacular fantasy superheroes behind and focused instead on grayscale renderings of a set of everyday lives thrown into chaos when an American-financed super-mall is constructed in their struggling English town.
Originally titled the The Mandelbrot Set, mathematic chaos theory factored heavily into the themes Moore was exploring. The story is expertly multi-faceted, as are the diverse, richly-layered characters that populate the town.
For a story that is built on a progressive development to be unfinished is tragic. That the project itself was thrown into chaos is tragically poetic.
Although Sienkiewicz’s art is largely denied the benefit of color, it is some of the most incredible of his career. He blends his signature expressionism with a level of realism never before seen in his work, and the juxtaposition is all the more powerful because of it. Befitting the mathematical theme of the story, the perfectly square pages are uniformly set on a repeating 4 × 4 grid with perfectly circular word balloons.
It was brilliant. It was revolutionary. And it was not to last…
comicartistevolution:

Bill Sienkiewicz 1990: Big Numbers #1
*sigh*
Big Numbers was to be an ambitious 12-part graphic novel by two of the biggest and revolutionary comic book masters at the top of their games.
It left the world of full-color spectacular fantasy superheroes behind and focused instead on grayscale renderings of a set of everyday lives thrown into chaos when an American-financed super-mall is constructed in their struggling English town.
Originally titled the The Mandelbrot Set, mathematic chaos theory factored heavily into the themes Moore was exploring. The story is expertly multi-faceted, as are the diverse, richly-layered characters that populate the town.
For a story that is built on a progressive development to be unfinished is tragic. That the project itself was thrown into chaos is tragically poetic.
Although Sienkiewicz’s art is largely denied the benefit of color, it is some of the most incredible of his career. He blends his signature expressionism with a level of realism never before seen in his work, and the juxtaposition is all the more powerful because of it. Befitting the mathematical theme of the story, the perfectly square pages are uniformly set on a repeating 4 × 4 grid with perfectly circular word balloons.
It was brilliant. It was revolutionary. And it was not to last…
comicartistevolution:

Bill Sienkiewicz 1990: Big Numbers #1
*sigh*
Big Numbers was to be an ambitious 12-part graphic novel by two of the biggest and revolutionary comic book masters at the top of their games.
It left the world of full-color spectacular fantasy superheroes behind and focused instead on grayscale renderings of a set of everyday lives thrown into chaos when an American-financed super-mall is constructed in their struggling English town.
Originally titled the The Mandelbrot Set, mathematic chaos theory factored heavily into the themes Moore was exploring. The story is expertly multi-faceted, as are the diverse, richly-layered characters that populate the town.
For a story that is built on a progressive development to be unfinished is tragic. That the project itself was thrown into chaos is tragically poetic.
Although Sienkiewicz’s art is largely denied the benefit of color, it is some of the most incredible of his career. He blends his signature expressionism with a level of realism never before seen in his work, and the juxtaposition is all the more powerful because of it. Befitting the mathematical theme of the story, the perfectly square pages are uniformly set on a repeating 4 × 4 grid with perfectly circular word balloons.
It was brilliant. It was revolutionary. And it was not to last…

comicartistevolution:

Bill Sienkiewicz 1990: Big Numbers #1

*sigh*

Big Numbers was to be an ambitious 12-part graphic novel by two of the biggest and revolutionary comic book masters at the top of their games.

It left the world of full-color spectacular fantasy superheroes behind and focused instead on grayscale renderings of a set of everyday lives thrown into chaos when an American-financed super-mall is constructed in their struggling English town.

Originally titled the The Mandelbrot Set, mathematic chaos theory factored heavily into the themes Moore was exploring. The story is expertly multi-faceted, as are the diverse, richly-layered characters that populate the town.

For a story that is built on a progressive development to be unfinished is tragic. That the project itself was thrown into chaos is tragically poetic.

Although Sienkiewicz’s art is largely denied the benefit of color, it is some of the most incredible of his career. He blends his signature expressionism with a level of realism never before seen in his work, and the juxtaposition is all the more powerful because of it. Befitting the mathematical theme of the story, the perfectly square pages are uniformly set on a repeating 4 × 4 grid with perfectly circular word balloons.

It was brilliant. It was revolutionary. And it was not to last…

(via kellysue)

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Andy Freeberg
Guardians
In the art museums of Russia, women sit in the galleries and guard the collections. When you look at the paintings and sculptures, the presence of the women becomes an inherent part of viewing the artwork itself. I found the guards as intriguing to observe as the pieces they watch over. In conversation they told me how much they like being among Russia’s great art. A woman in Moscow’s State Tretyakov Gallery Museum said she often returns there on her day off to sit in front of a painting that reminds her of her childhood home. Another guard travels three hours each day to work, since at home she would just sit on her porch and complain about her illnesses, “as old women do.” She would rather be at the museum enjoying the people watching, surrounded by the history of her country.
1. Stroganov Palace, Russian State Museum
2.Matisse Still Life, Hermitage Museum
3.Konchalovsky’s Family Portrait, State Tretyakov Gallery
4. Veronese’s Adoration of the Shepherds, Hermitage Museum
5. Rublev and Daniil’s The Deesis Tier, State Tretyakov Gallery
6. Michelangelo’s Moses and the Dying Slave, Pushkin Museum
7.Malevich’s Self Portrait, Russian State Museum
8. Nesterov’s Blessed St Sergius of Radonezh, Russian State Museum
9. Petrov-Vodkin’s Bathing of a Red Horse, State Tretyakov Gallery
10. Kugach’s Before the Dance, State Tretyakov Gallery
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Andy Freeberg
Guardians
In the art museums of Russia, women sit in the galleries and guard the collections. When you look at the paintings and sculptures, the presence of the women becomes an inherent part of viewing the artwork itself. I found the guards as intriguing to observe as the pieces they watch over. In conversation they told me how much they like being among Russia’s great art. A woman in Moscow’s State Tretyakov Gallery Museum said she often returns there on her day off to sit in front of a painting that reminds her of her childhood home. Another guard travels three hours each day to work, since at home she would just sit on her porch and complain about her illnesses, “as old women do.” She would rather be at the museum enjoying the people watching, surrounded by the history of her country.
1. Stroganov Palace, Russian State Museum
2.Matisse Still Life, Hermitage Museum
3.Konchalovsky’s Family Portrait, State Tretyakov Gallery
4. Veronese’s Adoration of the Shepherds, Hermitage Museum
5. Rublev and Daniil’s The Deesis Tier, State Tretyakov Gallery
6. Michelangelo’s Moses and the Dying Slave, Pushkin Museum
7.Malevich’s Self Portrait, Russian State Museum
8. Nesterov’s Blessed St Sergius of Radonezh, Russian State Museum
9. Petrov-Vodkin’s Bathing of a Red Horse, State Tretyakov Gallery
10. Kugach’s Before the Dance, State Tretyakov Gallery
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Andy Freeberg
Guardians
In the art museums of Russia, women sit in the galleries and guard the collections. When you look at the paintings and sculptures, the presence of the women becomes an inherent part of viewing the artwork itself. I found the guards as intriguing to observe as the pieces they watch over. In conversation they told me how much they like being among Russia’s great art. A woman in Moscow’s State Tretyakov Gallery Museum said she often returns there on her day off to sit in front of a painting that reminds her of her childhood home. Another guard travels three hours each day to work, since at home she would just sit on her porch and complain about her illnesses, “as old women do.” She would rather be at the museum enjoying the people watching, surrounded by the history of her country.
1. Stroganov Palace, Russian State Museum
2.Matisse Still Life, Hermitage Museum
3.Konchalovsky’s Family Portrait, State Tretyakov Gallery
4. Veronese’s Adoration of the Shepherds, Hermitage Museum
5. Rublev and Daniil’s The Deesis Tier, State Tretyakov Gallery
6. Michelangelo’s Moses and the Dying Slave, Pushkin Museum
7.Malevich’s Self Portrait, Russian State Museum
8. Nesterov’s Blessed St Sergius of Radonezh, Russian State Museum
9. Petrov-Vodkin’s Bathing of a Red Horse, State Tretyakov Gallery
10. Kugach’s Before the Dance, State Tretyakov Gallery
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Andy Freeberg
Guardians
In the art museums of Russia, women sit in the galleries and guard the collections. When you look at the paintings and sculptures, the presence of the women becomes an inherent part of viewing the artwork itself. I found the guards as intriguing to observe as the pieces they watch over. In conversation they told me how much they like being among Russia’s great art. A woman in Moscow’s State Tretyakov Gallery Museum said she often returns there on her day off to sit in front of a painting that reminds her of her childhood home. Another guard travels three hours each day to work, since at home she would just sit on her porch and complain about her illnesses, “as old women do.” She would rather be at the museum enjoying the people watching, surrounded by the history of her country.
1. Stroganov Palace, Russian State Museum
2.Matisse Still Life, Hermitage Museum
3.Konchalovsky’s Family Portrait, State Tretyakov Gallery
4. Veronese’s Adoration of the Shepherds, Hermitage Museum
5. Rublev and Daniil’s The Deesis Tier, State Tretyakov Gallery
6. Michelangelo’s Moses and the Dying Slave, Pushkin Museum
7.Malevich’s Self Portrait, Russian State Museum
8. Nesterov’s Blessed St Sergius of Radonezh, Russian State Museum
9. Petrov-Vodkin’s Bathing of a Red Horse, State Tretyakov Gallery
10. Kugach’s Before the Dance, State Tretyakov Gallery
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Andy Freeberg
Guardians
In the art museums of Russia, women sit in the galleries and guard the collections. When you look at the paintings and sculptures, the presence of the women becomes an inherent part of viewing the artwork itself. I found the guards as intriguing to observe as the pieces they watch over. In conversation they told me how much they like being among Russia’s great art. A woman in Moscow’s State Tretyakov Gallery Museum said she often returns there on her day off to sit in front of a painting that reminds her of her childhood home. Another guard travels three hours each day to work, since at home she would just sit on her porch and complain about her illnesses, “as old women do.” She would rather be at the museum enjoying the people watching, surrounded by the history of her country.
1. Stroganov Palace, Russian State Museum
2.Matisse Still Life, Hermitage Museum
3.Konchalovsky’s Family Portrait, State Tretyakov Gallery
4. Veronese’s Adoration of the Shepherds, Hermitage Museum
5. Rublev and Daniil’s The Deesis Tier, State Tretyakov Gallery
6. Michelangelo’s Moses and the Dying Slave, Pushkin Museum
7.Malevich’s Self Portrait, Russian State Museum
8. Nesterov’s Blessed St Sergius of Radonezh, Russian State Museum
9. Petrov-Vodkin’s Bathing of a Red Horse, State Tretyakov Gallery
10. Kugach’s Before the Dance, State Tretyakov Gallery
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Andy Freeberg
Guardians
In the art museums of Russia, women sit in the galleries and guard the collections. When you look at the paintings and sculptures, the presence of the women becomes an inherent part of viewing the artwork itself. I found the guards as intriguing to observe as the pieces they watch over. In conversation they told me how much they like being among Russia’s great art. A woman in Moscow’s State Tretyakov Gallery Museum said she often returns there on her day off to sit in front of a painting that reminds her of her childhood home. Another guard travels three hours each day to work, since at home she would just sit on her porch and complain about her illnesses, “as old women do.” She would rather be at the museum enjoying the people watching, surrounded by the history of her country.
1. Stroganov Palace, Russian State Museum
2.Matisse Still Life, Hermitage Museum
3.Konchalovsky’s Family Portrait, State Tretyakov Gallery
4. Veronese’s Adoration of the Shepherds, Hermitage Museum
5. Rublev and Daniil’s The Deesis Tier, State Tretyakov Gallery
6. Michelangelo’s Moses and the Dying Slave, Pushkin Museum
7.Malevich’s Self Portrait, Russian State Museum
8. Nesterov’s Blessed St Sergius of Radonezh, Russian State Museum
9. Petrov-Vodkin’s Bathing of a Red Horse, State Tretyakov Gallery
10. Kugach’s Before the Dance, State Tretyakov Gallery
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Andy Freeberg
Guardians
In the art museums of Russia, women sit in the galleries and guard the collections. When you look at the paintings and sculptures, the presence of the women becomes an inherent part of viewing the artwork itself. I found the guards as intriguing to observe as the pieces they watch over. In conversation they told me how much they like being among Russia’s great art. A woman in Moscow’s State Tretyakov Gallery Museum said she often returns there on her day off to sit in front of a painting that reminds her of her childhood home. Another guard travels three hours each day to work, since at home she would just sit on her porch and complain about her illnesses, “as old women do.” She would rather be at the museum enjoying the people watching, surrounded by the history of her country.
1. Stroganov Palace, Russian State Museum
2.Matisse Still Life, Hermitage Museum
3.Konchalovsky’s Family Portrait, State Tretyakov Gallery
4. Veronese’s Adoration of the Shepherds, Hermitage Museum
5. Rublev and Daniil’s The Deesis Tier, State Tretyakov Gallery
6. Michelangelo’s Moses and the Dying Slave, Pushkin Museum
7.Malevich’s Self Portrait, Russian State Museum
8. Nesterov’s Blessed St Sergius of Radonezh, Russian State Museum
9. Petrov-Vodkin’s Bathing of a Red Horse, State Tretyakov Gallery
10. Kugach’s Before the Dance, State Tretyakov Gallery
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Andy Freeberg
Guardians
In the art museums of Russia, women sit in the galleries and guard the collections. When you look at the paintings and sculptures, the presence of the women becomes an inherent part of viewing the artwork itself. I found the guards as intriguing to observe as the pieces they watch over. In conversation they told me how much they like being among Russia’s great art. A woman in Moscow’s State Tretyakov Gallery Museum said she often returns there on her day off to sit in front of a painting that reminds her of her childhood home. Another guard travels three hours each day to work, since at home she would just sit on her porch and complain about her illnesses, “as old women do.” She would rather be at the museum enjoying the people watching, surrounded by the history of her country.
1. Stroganov Palace, Russian State Museum
2.Matisse Still Life, Hermitage Museum
3.Konchalovsky’s Family Portrait, State Tretyakov Gallery
4. Veronese’s Adoration of the Shepherds, Hermitage Museum
5. Rublev and Daniil’s The Deesis Tier, State Tretyakov Gallery
6. Michelangelo’s Moses and the Dying Slave, Pushkin Museum
7.Malevich’s Self Portrait, Russian State Museum
8. Nesterov’s Blessed St Sergius of Radonezh, Russian State Museum
9. Petrov-Vodkin’s Bathing of a Red Horse, State Tretyakov Gallery
10. Kugach’s Before the Dance, State Tretyakov Gallery
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Andy Freeberg
Guardians
In the art museums of Russia, women sit in the galleries and guard the collections. When you look at the paintings and sculptures, the presence of the women becomes an inherent part of viewing the artwork itself. I found the guards as intriguing to observe as the pieces they watch over. In conversation they told me how much they like being among Russia’s great art. A woman in Moscow’s State Tretyakov Gallery Museum said she often returns there on her day off to sit in front of a painting that reminds her of her childhood home. Another guard travels three hours each day to work, since at home she would just sit on her porch and complain about her illnesses, “as old women do.” She would rather be at the museum enjoying the people watching, surrounded by the history of her country.
1. Stroganov Palace, Russian State Museum
2.Matisse Still Life, Hermitage Museum
3.Konchalovsky’s Family Portrait, State Tretyakov Gallery
4. Veronese’s Adoration of the Shepherds, Hermitage Museum
5. Rublev and Daniil’s The Deesis Tier, State Tretyakov Gallery
6. Michelangelo’s Moses and the Dying Slave, Pushkin Museum
7.Malevich’s Self Portrait, Russian State Museum
8. Nesterov’s Blessed St Sergius of Radonezh, Russian State Museum
9. Petrov-Vodkin’s Bathing of a Red Horse, State Tretyakov Gallery
10. Kugach’s Before the Dance, State Tretyakov Gallery
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Andy Freeberg
Guardians
In the art museums of Russia, women sit in the galleries and guard the collections. When you look at the paintings and sculptures, the presence of the women becomes an inherent part of viewing the artwork itself. I found the guards as intriguing to observe as the pieces they watch over. In conversation they told me how much they like being among Russia’s great art. A woman in Moscow’s State Tretyakov Gallery Museum said she often returns there on her day off to sit in front of a painting that reminds her of her childhood home. Another guard travels three hours each day to work, since at home she would just sit on her porch and complain about her illnesses, “as old women do.” She would rather be at the museum enjoying the people watching, surrounded by the history of her country.
1. Stroganov Palace, Russian State Museum
2.Matisse Still Life, Hermitage Museum
3.Konchalovsky’s Family Portrait, State Tretyakov Gallery
4. Veronese’s Adoration of the Shepherds, Hermitage Museum
5. Rublev and Daniil’s The Deesis Tier, State Tretyakov Gallery
6. Michelangelo’s Moses and the Dying Slave, Pushkin Museum
7.Malevich’s Self Portrait, Russian State Museum
8. Nesterov’s Blessed St Sergius of Radonezh, Russian State Museum
9. Petrov-Vodkin’s Bathing of a Red Horse, State Tretyakov Gallery
10. Kugach’s Before the Dance, State Tretyakov Gallery

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Andy Freeberg

Guardians

In the art museums of Russia, women sit in the galleries and guard the collections. When you look at the paintings and sculptures, the presence of the women becomes an inherent part of viewing the artwork itself. I found the guards as intriguing to observe as the pieces they watch over. In conversation they told me how much they like being among Russia’s great art. A woman in Moscow’s State Tretyakov Gallery Museum said she often returns there on her day off to sit in front of a painting that reminds her of her childhood home. Another guard travels three hours each day to work, since at home she would just sit on her porch and complain about her illnesses, “as old women do.” She would rather be at the museum enjoying the people watching, surrounded by the history of her country.

1. Stroganov Palace, Russian State Museum

2.Matisse Still Life, Hermitage Museum

3.Konchalovsky’s Family Portrait, State Tretyakov Gallery

4. Veronese’s Adoration of the Shepherds, Hermitage Museum

5. Rublev and Daniil’s The Deesis Tier, State Tretyakov Gallery

6. Michelangelo’s Moses and the Dying Slave, Pushkin Museum

7.Malevich’s Self Portrait, Russian State Museum

8. Nesterov’s Blessed St Sergius of Radonezh, Russian State Museum

9. Petrov-Vodkin’s Bathing of a Red Horse, State Tretyakov Gallery

10. Kugach’s Before the Dance, State Tretyakov Gallery

(via anti-banksy)

oldbookillustrations:

At night.

Carl Larsson, from Singoalla, by Viktor Rydberg, Stockholm, 1894.

(Source: archive.org)

(via goeasysteplightly)

design-is-fine:

Heinz Edelmann, book cover design for Lord of the Rings by Tolkien, 1969/70. Klett-Cotta Verlag, Stuttgart.

(via catzrule)


New Slaves (live on SNL) © 2013

New Slaves (live on SNL) © 2013

New Slaves (live on SNL) © 2013

New Slaves (live on SNL) © 2013

New Slaves (live on SNL) © 2013

New Slaves (live on SNL) © 2013

New Slaves (live on SNL) © 2013

New Slaves (live on SNL) © 2013
New Slaves (live on SNL) © 2013

(via bourgeoisyeezy)

periodicult90s:

Keds, Mademoiselle magazine, September 1990.

(via clovern)